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Fluidic Analytics tour

last modified May 16, 2016 11:25 AM
NanoDTC students and associates explore the development of products that enable easier, faster, more convenient and more accurate protein characterisation

On 6th May NanoDTC students and associates visited Fluidic Analytics - a recent spin off from the University of Cambridge (Department of Chemistry) focussing on developing modern analytical tools to study proteins.

The students were given a tour of the facilities by the Head of Technology at the company, Thomas Müller and his colleagues. The NanoDTC students and associates used the opportunity to ask a lot of questions about the technology itself, about the main challenges the company is facing now and where they see the company in 5-10 years' time. The day culminated with seeing the first product which was almost ready and will hopefully be sent to the first customers soon!

Everyone concluded it was a very exciting learning experience and a very interesting afternoon. The students and associates are grateful to the NanoDTC for organising the tour and for Fluidic Analytics for hosting them.

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