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Outreach workshop

last modified Nov 03, 2015 02:47 PM
NanoDTC students organised a very popular interactive workshop “Why you should not shrink to the nano-scale” at the Girls Schools Association Biennial science outreach event

On Monday 19th October 2015, NanoDTC students, in collaboration with students from the Nanoscience Centre and the Department of Materials Science, coordinated an interactive workshop at the University Technical College (UTC) Cambridge, as part of the GSA Girl Power: Women in Bio-Technology and Engineering Conference. 

The workshop was themed around five different aspects where nanoscience reveals interesting facets of nature (five odd behaviours one would encounter if one shrunk to the nanoscale) and was configured into a fun format involving games and hands-on activities. The workshop was extremely popular and attended by nearly 100 students. Special thanks go to Jasmine Rivett, Becky Kershaw, Nicole Weckman, Alexandra Vaideanu, Sonja Kinna, Geraldine Baekelandt, James Xiao, Anna Eiden, Alex Avramenko and Carmen Palacios Berraquero for organising!

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