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Nano Bio Technologies

Nano-Bio Technologies have seen one of the earliest translations of nanoscience into biomedical technologies, with uses in cellular imaging and mechanisms, sensing, regeneration, and targeting of disease. The NanoDTC research in Nano-Bio includes projects in ultra-high resolution imaging of biological (sub-cellular) entities, microfluidic assays and coded nanotag sensing,  tip-neuron interactions and nano-mechanical cues for neuron re-growth, scaffolds for bone regeneration, ultrahigh sensitivity biomolecular sensing and neurotransmitter assays through plasmonics, ultra-high-speed genetic sequencing using nano-apertures, nanoparticle toxicity,  and insect adhesion mechanisms at the nanoscale.

Research Groups involved include: Biological and Soft Systems (Physics), Knowles Lab (Chemistry), Scherman Group (Chemistry), Nanophotonics Group (Physics), Laser Analytics (Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology), Franze Lab (Physiology, Development and NeuroScience), Insect Biomechanics Group (Zoology) and many others.

Our Research Theme in Nano Bio Technologies includes anything with an element of biology or biological materials / soft matter.

Please contact our Nano Bio Technologies Theme Coordinator Dr. Eileen Nugent or our Teaching Fellow Dr. Karishma Jain to find out more about this theme.

RSS Feed Latest news

Call for Mini Project proposals

Jun 19, 2019

The NanoDTC invites Mini Project proposals from Cambridge Academics for its incoming c2019 cohort. Submission deadline is 11th Oct 2019.

40 new EPSRC studentships for NanoDTC

Feb 04, 2019

We are pleased to announce that EPSRC have awarded a new Nano CDT grant of 40 studentships for training the next generation of interdisciplinary innovative nanoscientists

Midi+PhD Project Proposals from Cambridge Academics

Dec 19, 2018

We are now accepting project proposals for Midi (May-Jul 2019) + PhD projects (starting Oct 2019) for our c2018 students. Deadline 18 Feb.

NanoDTC student paper published in Nature Comms

Dec 07, 2018

c2013 student Jasmine Rivett was the first author on the recent paper, “Long-lived polarization memory in the electronic states of lead-halide perovskites from local structural dynamics” in Nature Communications.